Comes a Time

May 31, 2019

Checking in with oneself on a daily basis is a simple, yet profound practice. It allows us to stay in close contact with what we are feeling, look more closely at what is impacting us in our lives, and remain more aware of the larger consciousness that we are.

           

Our thinking minds can get all tangled up in to-do’s, dramas, made up scenarios, worries, concerns, plans, goals, and catastrophic habitual thinking. When we do a deeper dive into ourselves and drop below the thinking mind, we get to experience a larger self beyond thought, which puts all of those thoughts in a more accurate perspective.

           

I set my timer for 20 minutes and drop in to the deeper space each morning in meditation. Then I follow up with some inspirational reading. This sets the tone for my whole day. I have started it with time with myself to settle and connect.

           

 

If meditation is not for you, spending time with your cup of coffee in stillness can be helpful. No phone, no computer, no interaction with anyone but yourself will bring a sense of renewal. If you have access to nature, the nourishment it provides by just sensing into a tree or flowers or water is not to be missed.

           

Our culture can overwhelm us with messages of what we should do, want, have, think, be. Take back your life. You are the one to decide what it will be. And by checking in daily, you will receive clearer information from your inner guidance about what you truly want, how you truly feel and who you truly are.

 

There comes a time when the world gets quiet and the only thing left is your own heart. So you'd better learn the sound of it. Otherwise you'll never understand what it's saying. 
― Sarah Dessen

 

Time is the one thing we cannot have more of. Give some to you and you alone. It's the best gift you can give yourself and the rewards are plentiful.

 

Diane Ingram, PCC, is a Coach, Coach Trainer, Workshop Facilitator, and Speaker for Personal and Professional Development. She is a regular contributor to Pawling Public Radio and the author of five books. To learn more, visit DianeIngram.com online.

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